cherydactyl: (Default)
...in hearing about this new, about-to-be-launched, search engine, WolframAlpha?
cherydactyl: (aging gracefully)
via Yoga Journal's [livejournal.com profile] yogabuzz,



I am totally amused that that photo's caption is "Yoga granny: Bette Calman, 83, shows off the agonising peacock pose." (emphasis is mine.) It's not that agonizing. I'm not saying I can do it as well as she can yet, but balances aren't that agonizing, really.

Full story here
cherydactyl: (Default)


I *love* that pun.

Hey Patti!

Jan. 7th, 2009 09:56 pm
cherydactyl: (Default)
I just added an lj feed for the Project Grow Blog: [livejournal.com profile] a2prjctgrowblog
cherydactyl: (Default)
This is mainly so that [livejournal.com profile] curiouskendra sees it, but please enjoy. :)



This same group has a rendition of Bohemian Rhapsody that is priceless. Look that up too.
cherydactyl: (Default)
re-posted from [livejournal.com profile] geekparents

Superheroes in Chocolate: pictures from a catwalk show of edible superhero costumes, both classic and original characters.
http://www.lifeinthefastlane.ca/chocolate-superheroes-in-edible-costumes-at-chocolate-fest/offbeat-news
cherydactyl: (Default)
One of the science news feeds I follow coughed up an interesting article about why mental illness persists and is common...specifically citing that some mental issues in lite form are very adaptive. I guess it's akin to sickle cell anemia in that way.

An excerpt:
To explain our susceptibility to poor mental health, Randolph Nesse in "The Handbook of Evolutionary Psychology" (Wiley, 2005) compares the human brain with race horses: Just as horse breeding has selected for long thin legs that increase speed but are prone to fracture, cognitive advances also increase fitness — to a point.

Full article here

Aren't I the blitz-posting fool lately?
cherydactyl: (Default)
As if I needed another. I just like exercise.

Athletes and people who exercise not only have better bods — they have better brains too, a host of studies have now firmly established.

A review of studies published earlier this month, in fact, found that a balanced diet and regular exercise can protect the brain and ward off mental disorders.


Read the complete article at http://www.livescience.com/health/080806-brain-exercise.html

And...I just purchased a tag-a-long bike attachment so we can go on longer bike rides without over-taxing my younger daughter. Of course, a few weeks ago we did a round trip that took us from home, to our local library branch, to S's former school, to Qdoba, up by Arborland, south through The Village (where we had a stop due to an injury to older daughter S...which resulted in a trip to urgent care and three rather deep stitches--her dad picked her up and drove her), then back home. Google maps helped me to estimate a round trip of 9.1 miles for that. There were lots of rest stops, but she did it with no complaints. Go M! But we can probably have fewer rests with the tag-a-long, which makes bike errands slightly more practical. :) Now I just have to worry about how to lock the bike trailer thingy along with my bike. Well, and assembling it when it gets here, I guess. :)

And Hey!!! Google Maps has added a feature I can really get behind...you can specify walking or driving when getting directions now!! Cool! That will be very helpful when estimating routes for walking. *does a happy dance*
cherydactyl: (Default)
Times Like This, the time travel web comic I have followed and once posted about in this journal, is just not doing it for me. That is, all the discussion of the characters, especially the main character Cassie, doing it with this or that historical figure is getting to me. It's not that I don't like sex, or reading about sex, it's just really crude in TLT, I guess. For example, the allusion "Rode him like a Harley Liberator? Hell Yeah!" appears in the latest strip. I am just not into conquest language, or sex as a string of trophies, no matter if it's coming from a man or a woman character. Every time Cassie talks about who she's done lately (or then-ly), I feel a little sick. I think it's an artifact of telling rather than showing, because in order to tell us about her encounters, we get to hear her boasting about it to her friends, who also boast about their hookups. I (mostly) like the Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter novels and the Eve Dallas mystery series by J. D. Robb aka romance novelist Nora Roberts. They are literary snack food, like popcorn, not terribly substantial but fun. Especially the former series is pretty darned explicit, so I don't think it's sex per se, but the trophy ethic of Cassie and the other characters in TLT that is bothering me. Sorry [livejournal.com profile] thomasoverbeck, I liked the idea of a time travel comic very much. I am a pretty deep Doctor Who fan after all. But does the Doctor boast of who he's met and what he's done? No. No, he doesn't.
cherydactyl: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] adrian_turtle's reply to my Jedi Squirrels post about how American Grey Squirrels are endangering English red squirrels led me to some odd animal-related internet content from our friends at the post office: the Post Office's movers' advice for moving hippopotamuses and a story about how NOT to move a Gorilla.

Do not tell me that postal workers have no sense of humor.
cherydactyl: (Default)
[livejournal.com profile] cornellbox recently emailed me about the webcomic Darths & Droids. (Thanks!!) Do you remember The DM of The Rings? Well, this is the same idea, only using screen caps from Star Wars: The Phantom Menace, with a less rail-roading GM, and an explanation for Jar Jar that actually makes the character sympathetic and likable. Really. Amazing, I know, but they pull it off. It's way better than the movie, and better than DM of the Rings in several respects, at least so far. I kind of wish these guys would do the screen cap Harry Potter (Wands and something) saga they hint at as a side comic. (You'll just have to read through the comic notes and links to find the link to the one sample they did. Hehe)

I've just gotten myself up to speed, and decided getting the RSS feed was the way to make sure I didn't miss any new ones. So, here for your enjoyment, I announce the creation of [livejournal.com profile] darthsndroids.
cherydactyl: (Default)
I have two daughters and I heard this review.

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=89318829

I &hearts Peter Sagal.
cherydactyl: (Default)
Some but probably not all of you on my f'list know that Terry Pratchett, one of my favorite authors and the source of much glee for me and for my kids, announced fairly recently that he has an early onset form of Alzheimer's. He subsequently gave US $1 million to the Alzheimer’s Research Trust in the UK. Here's a copy of the speech he gave, which is also a good read. [livejournal.com profile] fastfwd proposed on [livejournal.com profile] discworld (the Discworld is the major fantasy world he writes in, with over 30 books in this setting) and in this post on his own journal that a half million of Pratchett's fans ("us") give one pound each, that the fans could match PTerry's donation, US $1 million being very roughly half a million pounds.

Another fan, [livejournal.com profile] gillo created a banner featuring PTerry from one of his movie cameos for this purpose:


If you have any interest at all, please consider giving a couple of bucks to this cause. I don't have any opinion whether giving to the UK fund that PTerry did is preferable over giving to your local Alzheimer's research fund.

Furthermore, the very first Discworld novel, The Colour of Magic, has just been made into a movie, which will be premiered in the UK at Easter on Sky One. A replica Luggage from the production, a full set of autographed Discworld books, a 30th anniversary edition of The Colour of Magic, signed by the stars of the movie, Sir David Jason and Sean Astin, and production notes on building the Luggage signed by PTerry, are up for auction on EBay here, currently going for £2,150.00. Proceeds are to go to the cause. If I were rich enough, I would bid on this in a heart beat.

After S and I finish reading The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, I think we might start on Good Omens, which is a PTerry collaboration with Neil Gaiman, and was my gateway to Gaiman's writing. The mainline Discworld novels are some of the best satire I've ever read. The juveniles (Maurice and the Tiffany Aching series) are some of the best kids' fantasy, and PTerry has received awards to corroborate my opinion, such as the Carnegie award Maurice received. If you haven't read PTerry's books, I strongly encourage you to do so. If you have read them, no doubt you are also a fan, so please throw a few bucks in to the pot for Alzheimer's in his honor.

ETA: and here's a newly minted website:http://www.matchitforpratchett.org/
This site includes other efforts, including a T-shirt sale, links to the US Alzheimer's foundation, and other auctions such as the rare and valued Once More* with Footnotes short story collection. There's also an lj fan who's talking about making and selling silk lilac boutinieres, a reference to a particular fictional memorial event in the Discworld.
cherydactyl: (Default)
via [livejournal.com profile] geekparents, Full Article Here.
Here's my favorite excerpt:

Pushing a teen into rebellion by having too many rules was a sort of statistical myth. “That actually doesn’t happen,” remarks Darling. She found that most rules-heavy parents don’t actually enforce them. “It’s too much work,” says Darling. “It’s a lot harder to enforce three rules than to set twenty rules.”

A few parents managed to live up to the stereotype of the oppressive parent, with lots of psychological intrusion, but those teens weren’t rebelling. They were obedient. And depressed.
[Hm, that sounds possibly familiar...lol]

“Ironically, the type of parents who are actually most consistent in enforcing rules are the same parents who are most warm and have the most conversations with their kids,” Darling observes. They’ve set a few rules over certain key spheres of influence, and they’ve explained why the rules are there. They expect the child to obey them. Over life’s other spheres, they supported the child’s autonomy, allowing them freedom to make their own decisions.
[And this is what I'm *trying* to do. I'm succeeding by fits and starts; I'm not as consistent as I would like yet. But I am trying. Besides my kids are only 9 and 5; I've still got lots of practice ahead.]

Profile

cherydactyl: (Default)
cherydactyl

September 2010

S M T W T F S
   1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
26 27282930  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 28th, 2017 12:52 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios